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Wk 4 Sara Orme Response

Sara Orme
Commercial photographer
Photography influences - Art history referencing paintings
Passion for sociology, documenting and narratives
Always looking for the unconventional

Advice
  • Don't be complacent
  • Collaborate (learning and working with others)
  • Never let gear stop you from moving forward
  • Think about your concepts (reference to history, classical paintings or portraits etc...)
  • Challenge yourself and your subjects (push out of the comfort zone)
  • You're the boss, its your vision take ownership of your shoots
  • Be aware with whats happening in the world
    • Try to stay relevant, keep reinventing
How Sara's advice relates to my photography
The thing that really struck a chord in me is her commitment to challenge herself.  I really admire her commitment to understanding what's going on around her.  Especially as she works within an ever changing environment (fashion photography).  From my end what i would practise is to reflect as much of my subject as i can.  Not get to comfortable with using the same easy techniques such as lighting set ups or poses; but to consider who my subject is and what there world is like.  

My response -
Above is photos that i shot of my nephew mimicking a photoshoot i was doing.  He jumped up onto the stool and started posing.  I was able to snap some shots of him before he got bored and walked away.

These photos are my responses to Sara Orme's series titled floating.  I choose these because they use similar elements -

  • Single subject
  • Contrast (Black and White - Shadow and light)
  • Sara's subject is suspended in the air, my subject is elevated by a stool
These photos share a common thread with my portfolio.  They are photos of a subject which i have a close connection with.  The subjects characteristics are evident, mirroring my portraits where i aim to capture the essence of the person i am photographing.  Another aspect which these photos share with my portraits is that light is the most essential part of the photo. The light highlights the contrast in these photos the background has detail and the subject does not where as in the portraits my subjects are place in front of a solid background while they are lit up  where you see the details of their faces.  




My lil Peter Pan - homage to Sara Orme



Sara Orme - Photo from her series Floating

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