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Wk 4 - Textures

Week 4 

The journey continues with manual mode!  Today we are looking at textures and using positive/Negative space.

Textures are described as something you can feel as well as see.  Textures add interest into your images, and often show objects from uncommon vantage points.  Below are some examples of texture photos which i shot.
f/32.0, 1/5, ISO 100
This piece wood has lines running through it.  The wood has many grooves and furry spongy plant matter growing between it. 

The reason why this photo is out of focus is because of camera shake.  This photo was taken hand held at a fast shutter speed.  For any speeds under 1/60 of a second require a tripod.

f29, 1/250, ISO 1600
The tyre marks made in the dirt are raised imprints, between are spikes of grass which are spread all along the tyre tracks. I like how the tyre track patterns are interrupted by the greenery which break up the photo and lead the eye into another direction instead of just up and down.  I think i might play with this image in photoshop and see what i come up with.

I wasn't really wow'ed by my textured photos during class, so i'll definitely be taking some more and at different angles.

Textures revisited...

Went for a drive down to Highbrook and stopped off to take some landscape photos by the water.  It was a terribly cold and the wind was going crazy.  I was able to take some of textured photos which i liked better - i was aiming for natural matter hence the dirt, stones and roots.  Anyways here they go!

f/5.6, 1/500, ISO 200
I know another dirt shot - but look how beautiful the detail is of the tire marks.  I like how the light cast shadows in the little groves of the patterns forming darker spaces only broken by flatterned parts which the tire did not fully go over.  This is a much better imprint, the patterns are a lot closer to each other which make them visually interesting.

f/36, 1/100, ISO 200
This is a shot of the carpark road.  Glistening from the recent pocket of rain which decided to let rip moments after i drove in to the carpark.  The water adds another interesting element to the texture of the stones.  Giving the edges of the stones touched by the water a smoother softer look.  There are some little puddles which have formed in between the spaces which have been filled with water.

f/36, 1/15, ISO 200
This is a shot of grass roots mixed with stones from the path.  The texture of these roots look woody, dry, tough and soggy.  I like how the stones can be found in different parts of the roots.  This could be because the roots have grown over the path or because the stones were kicked to the side by people walking by.









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